June POST certifications

POST logo

Congratulations to these Idaho Department of Correction staff members who are now POST-certified peace officers.

JOHN WARSHIP - PWCC

JAMILYNN GLENN - IMSI

DIXIE HOYT - IMSI

MARISSA JOHNSON - PWCC

CHRISTOPHER PATCHIN - IMSI

KRISTINA HAUSER - ISCC

RICKY HAMLIN - SICI

KIMBERLY RODRIGUEZ - ISCC

BRETT WILKINS - ISCC

CHRISTINE CORMIER - IMSI

CADE TERRY - ISCC

TYLER BROWN - ISCC

MATTHEW LYTLE - ISCC

Story published: 07/13/2015

Get breaking IDOC news first on Twitter!

Follow the department @idocalert. 

"Like" IDOC on Facebook at idoc.alert.

About POST certification

From the day a new correctional officer is hired they begin an extensive year of training, to gain the knowledge and experience, to become POST certified. 

This training begins with a one week New Employee Orientation, where new officers learn about IDOC policies, procedures, facilities, and the history of corrections in Idaho. New officers also get the opportunity during this week to meet many of the FTO’s they will be working with. 

The week following NEO is spent at an assigned training facility. During this week, new officers get to witness first-hand what it is like to work as a correctional officer in one of our facilities.

After this short week, it is time to start the four-week Correctional Officer Academy at POST. During the academy new officers will continue with the training process by learning about, how to communicate with inmates, deploy OC, self-defense tactics, amongst several other classes. 

Upon graduating from the academy, the new officers report to their permanently assigned facility to complete four weeks of on-the-job-training. This is when they get to combine their classroom training at POST with the practical application of the task at the facility. During this time, they are working on completing several training modules and scenarios that will help them become more proficient with correctional officer duties.

After completing OJT, they get to man a post, but they are not done with their training yet. The new officers still have to complete another section of training modules and scenarios in their training manual and complete their 2080 hour probationary period. 

After their entire training manual is complete, the new officers can submit their application for POST certification so that upon completing their 2080 hours of probation, they are officially POST certified as a correctional officer. 

Print this pagePrint this page